What you can do

What you can do

Believe it or not, but about 50% of the environmental impact during the lifetime of a garment is created while it is being used. And we know this sounds weird, but our aim is actually to increase this share further, because we want to produce with a declining environmental impact ourselves. Furthermore, the longer a garment is used, the higher the impact during the use phase (we hope now it doesn’t sound only contradictory, but also logical). However, there are many things consumers can do regarding their washing as well as in their consumption habits to help mitigate environmental impacts.

Product care

Only wash your clothes if really necessary. This already helps saving CO2, water, and makes garments last longer.
For denim counts the rule, that - if not visibly dirty - you also can put it in the freezer for 1-2 days.
This kills bacteria and odour and does not require any additional input (not kidding ☺)

Product Care

Furthermore, we recommend washing products, if they are not heavily dirty, at 30 degrees in the washing machine, which also contributes to saving energy. Also, try not to tumble dry clothes, since tumble dryers are energy consumption monsters and clothes dry surprisingly fast even in cold temperatures. The best thing is, that all the mentioned points have two positive outcomes: first, the environmental impact is mitigated through very simple methods, and second, the garment’s durability is increased through gentle caring - so treat your item like a princess.
Also, if possible, use organic detergents, since they get along without petrol-based tensides and other creepy stuff.

Reuse

Reuse

It is pretty obvious, that products that are designed for reuse make sense.
Tote bags, for example, make totally sense for your daily shoppings, and drinking bottles can replace the daily plastic water bottle in the canteen. Be aware, however, that tote bags and reusable bottles require production and raw materials, too, and that their production requires a lot more resources than the production of a simple plastic bag or bottle.
So, their use only makes sense if you do so on a regular basis.

Used Clothing

So, of course we hope that you will be happy with our clothes for a long time. But for many pieces, the day will come when you do simply not wear them often enough. What to do with the clothes then? Of course, in some countries there are good possibilities to sell your clothes online. In others, there aren’t. Furthermore, some people rather want to donate their old clothes. Some brands enable this to their clients by establishing a return option for used clothes. Those clothes, however, mostly are then brought or sold to local organisations that would get the clothes anyways, if you would give them to the charity collection bin.

Used Clothing

We at Twothirds think it is more efficient to recommend you to donate your still wearable clothes to organisations such as Oxfam, because actually they do not ship the pieces to developing countries to sell them there (while destroying local clothing industry), but resell them in your country in Oxfam shops. With the revenues, they then support many projects in the development assistance.
We say chapeau and want to support this.

Furthermore - and we know about the contradiction of this advice - consider buying stuff second hand. Some shops - like Oxfam or Red Cross - support trustworthy projects with the income, so do not only give them your stuff, but also consider buying there (you sometimes need patience to find nice stuff, but it’s definitely worth it!).